The Problem / Michigan's Maps / Gerrymandering in Michigan


Michigan's Maps


Michigan has some of the nation's worst gerrymandered districts.


According to The Center for Michigan, Michigan has some of the nation’s worst election maps. The best way to understand gerrymandering is to look at the voting districts that were drawn and approved in 2011. Check out Michigan’s Congressional, State House, and State Senate districts. Can you find the lines that split communities, neighborhoods, and school districts apart?


Michigan's Congressional Districts


In the 2016 election, Michiganders cast close to equal amounts of votes between Republican and Democratic candidates in congressional seat races. You would think that these races were competitive and resulted in equal representation in Congress. However due to gerrymandering, zero congressional races were decided by a margin of victory below 10% and Republicans took 64% of the seats.


Click a district to see the results or type in your address or ZIP Code to see how the results of your district.


Michigan's State House Districts


In the 2016 election, Democrats won more votes in Michigan’s state House elections (only by half a percentage point). Many would assume that out of 110 seats, they would be divided evenly, with 55 seats filled by Democrats and 55 seats filled by Republicans. But the result of politically influence district lines resulted in Republicans walking away with 63 out of 110 seats. How does this happen? Check out Michigan’s State House districts below.


Click a district to see the results or type in your address or ZIP Code to see how the results of your district.


Michigan's State Senate Districts


Michigan’s State Senate districts are considered the most imbalanced set of maps according to an analysis done by The Center From Michigan. Democrats and Republicans are divided with precision, leading to uncompetitive races won by large margins by both parties.


Click a district to see the results or type in your address or ZIP Code to see how the results of your district.


When districts are drawn for partisan advantage, our communities are torn apart and we’re left with ineffective politicians representing us in Lansing and D.C. The most alarming thing about these district maps are that politicians are legally allowed to draw the maps this way.


Read more about how the redistricting process in Michigan works >>